Monthly Archives: October 2015

The Pastor-Theologian?

Much has been written recently on the Pastor as Theologian or the Pastor as Theologian.[1] Derek Rishmawy has compiled a helpful list and summary of the main articles written thus far with, I believe, a fair assessment of each. I would also add Michael Kruger’s “Should You be a Pastor or Professor? Thinking Through the Options” as well as Andy Naselli’s “3 Reasons for a Pastor-Theologian to Get a PhD.”

The issue of the Pastor-Theologian is of specific interest to me, as the title of my blog indicates, because this is something I aim to fulfill in my ministry right now. This is why I read Gerald Hiestand and Todd Wilson’s work The Pastor Theologian: Resurrecting an Ancient Vision with great encouragement because I finally found this wrinkled vision in my mind ironed out just a bit smoother. As Rishmawy indicates, Hiestand and Wilson argue for the position of ecclesial theologian — that being the pastor as one who not only interacts with the life of his church but as well as participating and (perhaps) leading conversations in the academy. I agree with Rishmawy, in this case the pastor-theologian is a scholar. Continue reading

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Preaching: A Biblical Theology

I was very pleased to receive a copy of Preaching: A Biblical Theology by Jason C. Meyer, Pastor of Preaching and Vision at Bethlehem Baptist Church and have the chance to read the work of my former professor. Rather than the typical review, my aim is to include what I particularly enjoyed from Meyer’s book. As a result, this post will be brief, which is my intention. If you would prefer the traditional route, see my friend David Norman’s review here. preaching_meyer-683x1024

First, I appreciated Meyer’s structure. It is comprised of five parts with each building from the first five chapters, which is “Part One.” This section serves as a launching pad for the rest of the book and, as long as this is read first, it does not matter where the reader goes to next. Meyer did this because it allows the reader to choose their own starting “adventure” (14 – 15). In other words, the sections are not dependent upon one another as some books typically are.

Second, I appreciated Meyer’s careful guide through the Bible in “Part Two.” I believe this section is his strongest and the reader would do well to read it rather than skipping to “Part Three,” which is the technical aspect of preaching. Reading Meyer working through the Old Testament and providing the overall narrative it gives is a helpful summary of its contents, but his piecing together each patch of the seam shows the God of Israel at work in his nation.

Third, I appreciated Meyer ending his chapter with an illustration and point of application. Considering this is not a textbook on preaching it is a welcoming addition. Not only does it provide the reader and expositor of the Word examples of how to do application and illustration, but it also provides them with illustration aids that can be added to their own arsenal. Of course, credit must be given where credit is due if one chooses to use these in his sermon.

I commend this work to you and encourage you to add it to your shelf.

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The Culturally Relevant Church (?)

Can the church of Jesus Christ, who has been bought by his blood, be culturally relevant? What I mean is, can the church submit to the Lordship of Jesus while simultaneously catering to the needs of the culture? Perhaps this is still somewhat broad, so let me narrow it down with a “case study.”

Say you are new in town and as you are searching for a church to visit, you come across one who claims to be culturally relevant. What they mean by culturally relevant is they seek to make the worship service (singing/music) mirror that of the culture. What you will have is the light show, fog machines, and songs that are wanting in content. The pastor will preach a message that sounds like the gospel, but the content more or less focuses upon you doing something (Don’t Fear; Be Encouraged; Love Yourself; etc.). A speaking of the purpose for Christ’s death and why repentance is required lacks, but it seems that these people love Jesus while they seek to be relevant to the culture. Is this possible?

I would suggest no. Continue reading

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